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How do EASEMENTS impact Construction?

As the above-cited overview says, "Many people lack a clear understanding of easements, and the numerous legal problems that can arise" when they become an issue in YOUR real estate.

In simplest terms, an easement is a property grant that conveys its holder some right unrelated to actual possession in land owned by another party. Law school students commit to memory early in their studies the terms "dominant estate" (the person or entity that benefits from an easement) and "servient estate" (the owner of land who is encumbered by an easement right marked by some nonpossessory interest).

Easements are anything but mere academic subjects. Indeed, an easement right is what in some instances enables an individual to cut across the property of another party to reach his home. Conversely, an easement might restrict a dominant estate from using property in a manner that arguably harms a servient estate.

"License" is mere permit to use another's property, while "easement" implies interest therein.

Generally, license, no matter how long continued, is revocable at licensor's pleasure.

There are myriad types of easements, and questions regarding their creation, scope and termination can easily emerge in real estate-related matters in Florida and nationally. In fact, they do in thousands of instances each day.

The above-noted primer duly stresses the critical importance in understanding what an easement is and how it works for any party -- in either a residential or commercial context -- who will conceivably be affected by one or more these property rights.

The first step instilling clarity is to engage in a candid and informative conversation with a proven real estate and construction law attorney who routinely drafts, interprets and enforces easement rights and restrictions.

As the above-cited topic overview flatly notes, "Many people lack a clear understanding of easements, and the numerous legal problems that can arise" when they emerge as issues in your real estate.

In simplest terms, an easement is a property grant that conveys its holder some right unrelated to actual possession in land owned by another party. Law school students commit to memory early in their studies the terms "dominant estate" (the person or entity that benefits from an easement) and "servient estate" (the owner of land who is encumbered by an easement right marked by some nonpossessory interest).

Easements are anything but mere academic subjects. Indeed, an easement right is what in some instances enables an individual to cut across the property of another party to reach his home. Conversely, an easement might restrict a dominant estate from using property in a manner that arguably harms a servient estate.

"License" is mere permit to use another's property, while "easement" implies interest therein.

Generally, license, no matter how long continued, is revocable at licensor's pleasure.

There are myriad types of easements, and questions regarding their creation, scope and termination can easily emerge in real estate-related matters in Florida and nationally. In fact, they do in thousands of instances each day.

The above-noted primer duly stresses the critical importance in understanding what an easement is and how it works for any party -- in either a residential or commercial context -- who will conceivably be affected by one or more these property rights.

The first step instilling clarity is to engage in a candid and informative conversation with a proven real estate and construction law attorney who routinely drafts, interprets and enforces easement rights and restrictions.

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